The Best Typography-Based Sites of September 2014

October 1, 2014

This is the eighth installment of my monthly feature on Type & Grids where I pick my favorite type-driven websites from the previous month and then write a little about the typographic details behind the design. You can check out last month’s post for August here.

EBD Journal

EBD Journal

Rather than using a line break between paragraphs, the body copy on EBD Journal (set in Freight Text) follows the classic type setting convention of indenting the first sentence of each paragraph with no extra line break. This is how type has been set for hundreds of years in the print world but this convention was never widely adopted on the web for whatever reason. Circular, a geometric sans-serif from Lineto, is used for headers and titles while the monospaced font Atlas Typewriter is interspersed throughout, used for captions and footnotes.


Alec Dudson

Alec Dudson

Alec Dudson’s site mixes two serif typefaces, Portrait and Calluna. Mixing two serifs doesn’t always work, but I think these two play well together as their letterforms have similar characteristics.


Uncle Goose

Uncle Goose

This is a great example of a brand with consistent type across their product packaging and web presence. Neutraface, a geometric sans-serif from House Industries, seems to be seldomly used on the web, with the similar Brandon Grotesque being much more popular. I’m glad to see they stuck with Neutraface for their website keeping things consistent.


The Manual

The Manual

The Manual uses Franklin Gothic as their primary branding typeface and Freight Text for body copy — a typeface perfect for reading long passages of text. I really like how each issue is differentiated by a unique color. Be sure to support their Kickstarter campaign which ends on October 10, 2014.


The Fernway

The Fernway

ITC Clearface, a popular typeface of the 1970s, seems to be making a bit of a comeback lately, as I’ve seen it used more and more on the web. The Fernway pair it nicely with Brandon Grotesque.


un Projects

un Projects

FF Dagny, a sans-serif from FontFont, works well combined with Academica, a typeface designed for use in scientific papers. I love the use of Academica, but unfortunately the line length of the body text expands to fill the screen size, so on a large display like mine the readability suffers.


Shortstop

Shortstop

Futura and Clarendon make for a classic combo, just like coffee and donuts. Futura on its own can feel a little stark, but the addition of Clarendon adds warmth and playfulness.


Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon

This is a deep site with a ton of content and the designers did an excellent job of keeping the type consistent throughout. Gotham and Mercury, both from Hoefler & Co, make a beautiful combo. Having white text set on top of a photo background like in the header is always a dangerous thing to attempt though — using a light photo can quickly make the type illegible. Right now they seem to do a well enough job of only using dark photos that contrast with the type, however I’d hate to see what happens if the client starts adding their own photos.


Weston Vierregger

Weston Vierregger

Weston’s site combines Circular and Replica Mono, two typefaces from Swiss foundry Lineto. I feel like the colored underlines are a unique touch that really keep the type from feeling too sterile.


Homepolish

Homepolish

I’ve always been a big fan of Miller, a Scotch Roman from Matthew Carter, designer of the ubiquitous Georgia. Pairing Miller with ITC Johnston, a humanist face famous for its use in the London Underground, makes for a unique and interesting combo. My only complaint about this site is the logo which uses a scaled down PNG, making it appear slightly blurry. Setting it as a web font would ensure a clear and crisp display.


Keep Up With the Latest in Web Typography

If you enjoyed this post then you’ll probably really like Typewolf, my other side project. Typewolf features the best type-centric designs from around the web with the web fonts identified. It’s an excellent resource to check out the next time you need to choose a typeface for your next web project. You can follow Typewolf on Twitter and Tumblr or sign up to receive a weekly email summary.

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